Voting by the Numbers

6 facts about voting in the U.S.

When most Americans turn 18, they are eligible to cast a ballot for their local, state, and federal representatives. Let’s take a closer look at the facts about voting in America.

54

The percentage of American voters who cast ballots in person in the 2020 presidential election.

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46

The percentage of American voters who voted by mail-in or absentee ballot in the 2020 presidential election.

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3

The number of places — the District of Columbia, Maine, and Vermont — that allow convicted felons to vote while incarcerated. In other states, felons lose their voting rights while incarcerated and may even lose voting rights indefinitely.

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5

The number of states — Colorado, Hawaii, Oregon, Utah, and Washington — that have universal mail voting. In all-mail elections, every registered voter receives a ballot in the mail that can be returned either by mail or to a designated drop box. Three other states — California, Nebraska, and North Dakota — allow their counties to opt into conducting all-mail elections. 

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3

The number of places — California, the District of Columbia, and Nevada — that implemented all-mail voting systems for the 2020 presidential election only.

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25

The number of places (24 states plus the District of Columbia) that allow early in-person voting on weekends. Delaware will offer early weekend voting in 2022.

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